CHRISTMAS FOODS YOU SHOULD NEVER FEED YOUR DOG

Updated on December 12, 2022

Since our dogs are practically our children, it’s no surprise that many people like having their furry friends partake in the holiday festivities and receive extra special treatment from their loved ones over the season. Many of you, we know, have given your dog a taste of the Christmas food on your plate or bought them a special doggy Christmas sweater.

While it’s tempting to go to town on your dog during the holidays, it’s important to remember that there are many hidden dangers for dogs, especially when it comes to the cuisine that’s traditionally eaten at this time of year.

It’s important to resist your dog’s adorable puppy dog eyes pleading for a bite of your mince pie since many of the tasty foods we eat at Christmas can be quite harmful to your pet.

CHRISTMAS FOODS TO AVOID

We’ve compiled a list of some common holiday treats that you might have lying around throughout the holiday season but should never serve to your dog. The good news is that there are still plenty of Christmas foods that are safe for your dog to eat, which is sure to make your dog happy.

CHOCOLATE

DANGEROUS HOLIDAY TREATS FOR DOGS
Bad for dogs Christmas treats
Canine-unfriendly holiday treats
Read up on canines.
On this date in 2021, November 10
Composed by the editors at Pure Pet Food
Since our dogs are practically our children, it’s no surprise that many people like having their furry friends partake in the holiday festivities and receive extra special treatment from their loved ones over the season. Many of you, we know, have given your dog a taste of the Christmas food on your plate or bought them a special doggy Christmas sweater.

While it’s tempting to go to town on your dog during the holidays, it’s important to remember that there are many hidden dangers for dogs, especially when it comes to the cuisine that’s traditionally eaten at this time of year.

It’s important to resist your dog’s adorable puppy dog eyes pleading for a bite of your mince pie since many of the tasty foods we eat at Christmas can be quite harmful to your pet.

Here at blog-ctablog-cta, you’ll find the scrumptious treats your dog has been craving.
Check it out and read on

FOODS TO AVOID THIS CHRISTMAS
We’ve compiled a list of some common holiday treats that you might have lying around throughout the holiday season but should never serve to your dog. The good news is that there are still plenty of Christmas foods that are safe for your dog to eat, which is sure to make your dog happy.

CHOCOLATE
Hazardous holiday treats for canines
Hazardous holiday treats for canines
You can find a chocolate version of just about anything associated with Christmas, including advent calendars, selection boxes, chocolate reindeer, chocolate pennies, and even chocolate baubles. Our four-legged buddies can’t join us in enjoying a holiday chocolate or two (or the whole box), but we humans can.

Chocolate is not only unhealthy and sugary, but it also includes two methylxanthine alkaloids that are particularly harmful to dogs: theobromine and caffeine. Contrary to expectations, the darker the chocolate, the higher the theobromine content. If you give your dog chocolate, he or she could get sick, and possibly die, from chocolate poisoning.

Weird as it may sound, the reason why people can eat chocolate but dogs can’t is due to the fact that our bodies process the substance in a different way. Theobromine and caffeine are hazardous to dogs because they cannot be metabolized like they are in humans. This means that the chemicals remain in the system for much longer. In addition to raising blood pressure and pulse rate, the two compounds in chocolate also have adverse effects on the nervous system.

Besides nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, chocolate poisoning can cause panting, dehydration, restlessness, tremors, convulsions, and even death. Call your vet if you suspect your dog has eaten chocolate, as the signs and severity of poisoning can vary widely from dog to dog based on the amount of chocolate consumed and the dog’s size.

GRAVY AND STUFFING

Don’t allow your dog lick your plate or snack on the leftovers; the gravy and stuffing are both essential parts of the Christmas meal, but they’re packed with elements that are bad for dogs’ health.

While your dog would be your greatest friend forever if you let it lap up the gravy, doing so poses serious health risks due to the high levels of fat and salt it contains.

Not only that, but onions and garlic are common ingredients in gravy, adding to its flavor and helping to explain why it is so popular. The allium plant family, which includes onions, garlic, leeks, and shallots, is toxic to dogs but is a common ingredient in holiday feasts. Consumption of any member of the allium family, which contains a compound called thiosulphate, can give your dog a great deal of sickness, lethargy, weakness, pale gums, and damage to the red blood cells, which is quite harmful and can lead to anemia.

Stuffing, another traditional component of Christmas meals, can be extremely harmful due to the presence of onion and garlic. Moreover, stuffing is often loaded with herbs and spices, which makes it so appetizing to people but might cause a lot of stomach trouble in your dog.

You should consult a veterinarian about the best course of action if you discover your dog has eaten onion or garlic.

BONES

If you want to treat your dog to some of your Christmas dinner, the turkey is an excellent choice because it is lean and healthy for your dog to eat, but the bones should be avoided.

Because dogs are known to find bones irresistible, it may be tempting to give Fido a piece of the leftover turkey after everyone has finished eating.

Bones from any kind of cooked meat, however, present a serious hazard to dogs because of the risk of choking, the possibility of gastrointestinal obstruction, and the potential for splintering. Bones that have been cooked tend to shatter, which poses a serious risk to your dog’s health because it can cause internal injuries.

CURRANTS, RAISINS, SULTANAS AND GRAPES

We humans get to enjoy a wide variety of tasty goodies over the holiday season. Currants, raisins, sultanas, and grapes are used extensively in the mincemeat filling of the Christmas pies we devour the entire month of December.

All of these fruits come from the family Vitis vinifera and can be harmful to canines.

Keep these fruits out of your dog’s grasp at all costs; we don’t know why or how they have such a negative effect on canines but not humans.

Some dogs may show no signs of poisoning after eating these fruits, while others may become extremely ill after doing so. A person may experience anything from a mild stomachache to renal failure and anuria (a lack of urine production).

You should get in touch with your doctor as soon as you realize your pet has consumed one of these toxic fruits because the onset of symptoms can take as little as an hour and as much as three days. If they’ve just eaten it, your vet may choose to induce vomiting to remove the poison before it has a chance to be absorbed by the body.

PIGS IN BLANKETS

Many people consider pigs in blankets an essential component of a Christmas meal because of how wonderful they are. Bacon and sausages are incredibly delicious to both humans and canines since they are bursting with flavor and have an irresistible aroma.

Even though a single pig in a blanket would be the ultimate high-value gift for your canine companion, you should never offer it to them because they are so extraordinarily heavy in salt and fat and calorie-dense.

Although we shouldn’t eat them either because of how unhealthy they are, canines are more vulnerable to the effects of excess salt and fat. Your dog may gain weight, experience digestive problems, and potentially develop acute pancreatitis as a result.

Sausage brands often include flavor-enhancing additives like garlic, leeks, and onions. Yet, we all know that these are poisonous to dogs, so it’s best not to take any chances. Even while it’s rare that your dog may have a severe response to pigs in blankets, it’s always better to be cautious than sorry.

It’s going to be really hard to resist those adorable puppy dog eyes when you pull the pigs in blankets from the oven. In other words, the delightful aroma will be excruciating for your poor dog because his or her sense of smell is between 10,000 and 100,000 times stronger than ours.

MACADAMIA NUTS AND WALNUTS

Feeding your dog nuts, especially salted nuts like peanuts, cashews, or pistachios, is never a good idea. They can be harmful to a dog’s pancreas and digestive system, and they can be a choking hazard or even cause internal tearing if they have shells. Don’t give your dog regular access to your peanuts because they are heavy in fat and could lead to obesity.

However, macadamia nuts and walnuts, two varieties of nuts typically seen around Christmas, are really toxic to dogs, causing severe issues if consumed. Walnuts contain a toxin called tremorgenic mycotoxin, which can cause seizures and other issues, in addition to being difficult to digest and potentially causing gastrointestinal distress.

It is crucial that you keep macadamia nuts away from your dog, as they are even more toxic than walnuts. Similar to the toxicity of grapes and raisins, even a small amount of them can have a significant effect.

The specific toxin in macadamia nuts that causes difficulties including transient paralysis, tremors, and other neurological problems is yet unclear, but we do know that it exists. If your dog has consumed this food item, please contact your veterinarian immediately.

HUMAN DESSERTS AND SWEETS

Since Christmas is a time for overindulgence, it’s possible that your kitchen is stocked to the brim with tins of snacks and sweets to be enjoyed after dinner or whenever the mood strikes.

Dogs will become sick from eating these goodies because they are full of sugar and other elements that are bad for humans but far worse for canines. As a sugar alternative, xylitol is likely to be included in any sugar-free candy that bears that name. Unfortunately, xylitol is extremely toxic. It is critical to bring your dog to the vet as soon as possible if they have accidentally consumed xylitol.

OTHER CHRISTMAS STAPLES TO AVOID:

Drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
The canine digestive system enjoys cheese, but eating too much of it might be problematic. Put the cheeseboards out of reach.
Most vegetables are safe for dogs, but those doused with fatty condiments, honey, or seasonings should be avoided.
Some traditional Christmas plants are known to be stomach-souring if ingested. It’s best to avoid coming into contact with holly, mistletoe, and ivy. Spiky pines used to make Christmas trees are dangerous because they can puncture skin and even cause internal bleeding.

WHAT TO DO IF YOUR DOG EATS SOMETHING THEY SHOULDN’T HAVE

To a large extent, this is determined by how much and what your dog consumed. Consult your vet if you suspect your dog has eaten something harmful; in some cases, he or she may prescribe medicine and induce vomiting.

Even though the holidays are a fun time for everyone, including dogs, many threats can sneak up on them.

INSTEAD OF FEEDING THEM YOUR CHRISTMAS DINNER…

If you want to give your dog a special present this Christmas, consider getting him or her a new toy. An excellent present idea is a puzzle game/fun feeder, which can be stocked with yummy, dog-friendly treats to keep your canine companions occupied while you prepare Christmas dinner. Your dog’s mind will be stimulated and engaged with these toys, and you can both be assured that your pet will be ready for a nap afterward. If you’re looking for a quick sleep on Christmas Day, this is the way to go!

If you want to take your dog for a stroll on Christmas morning, bundle up because it’s going to be a chilly one. With any luck, this will wear them out right away, allowing you to enjoy a calm and peaceful Christmas.

 

 

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