DO LILY FLOWERS HURT DOGS?

Updated on April 16, 2023

Many common houseplants and garden varieties can be harmful to pets. Flowers like lilies are frequently used in arrangements and as houseplants, but cat owners know full well that these flowers are extremely poisonous to their pets. But are flowers toxic to canines as well?

ARE LILIES POISONOUS TO DOGS?

It’s true that lilies are toxic to canines. The consumption of even “non-toxic” lily species can nevertheless result in disease. In the event that your dog ingests any portion of a lily plant, they may experience nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, and abdominal pain. In the event that your dog has ingested a lily and is acting sick, you should seek medical attention immediately.

WHAT LILIES ARE POISONOUS TO DOGS?

Whether or not they are dangerous, canines should avoid eating any kind of lily. Common lily species that are toxic to canines include:

The Calla Lily
The Easter Lily
Called “glory lilies”
Peace lily, leopard lily, and the Japanese display lily
Blooming in Peru, the Peruvian lily
Insect-attracting stargazer lilies
Lil ti

HOW THE TYPE OF LILY AFFECTS YOUR DOG

Any member of the genus Lilium (commonly known as “true lilies”) is toxic to dogs. Keep your dog away from any plant with the word “Lilium” anywhere in the name.

The alkaloids in these lilies are toxic and can cause damage to the body’s red blood cells. Consumption of these lilies leads to fatal organ failure in cats. Even if your dog doesn’t overeat, there’s still a chance that their internal organs will be damaged.

Even though daylilies (scientifically known as “Hemerocallis”) aren’t considered toxic to canines, giving them even a small amount can make them sick. However, similar to genuine lilies, these plants are extremely poisonous to cats. It’s better to be safe than sorry, so keep these plants out of reach of your pets anyway.

There are lily species that defy classification. However, even if they are less toxic, plants like the peace lily (Spathiphyllum) and the Calla lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica) can still make cats sick.

When chewed, Calla and Peace lilies release calcium oxalate crystals, which can bring their own set of difficulties. If your dog comes into touch with these crystals, it could lead to burns, irritation, and inflammation in the mouth, lips, and skin. Your dog may experience drooling, vomiting, and loss of appetite due to the mouth irritation. It’s unlikely, but the swelling in your dog’s lips could spread to their neck, making it difficult for them to breathe.

Lily of the Valley is not related to lilies at all; rather, it grows in the same family as asparagus. However, dogs should not consume this plant because it is poisonous. They pose a serious health risk to your dog if ingested in excessive quantities.

WHAT PART OF THE LILY IS TOXIC TO DOGS?

Both dogs and cats can be poisoned by ingesting any part of the lily plant. That’s the petals, sepals, leaves, stalks, and bulbs, as well as the pollen and stamens.

As opposed to the rest of the plant, the bulb contains the vast majority of the poison. While the entire lily is dangerous, the bulb contains a higher concentration of the toxins that make it lethal. Many flower bulbs are harmful to dogs, so it is im-paw-tent to keep them out of your dog’s reach if you are a gardener. This also means you’ll need to keep your dog from digging them up.

No matter how well we buried our newly planted bulbs in raised beds, our spaniel would always find a way to unearth them. She never actually tried to eat them, but she did walk around with them in her mouth, which was obviously dangerous. Finally, we walled off the flower beds to prevent her from accessing them.

Similarly, if your bouquet includes cut lilies, place the vase somewhere your dog can’t get it. If you want to avoid having your dog eat the flowers, you should examine the area surrounding the vase on a frequent basis and pick up any fallen petals or stems.

The water remaining in a vase after lilies have been removed is extremely poisonous to cats and can make dogs sick. Again, make sure the vase is out of paw’s reach by using a tall one if at all possible. It will be difficult for pets to get to the water inside if they are intrigued and try to drink from it. When your flowers have finished blooming, remove them from the water immediately.

IS THE SMELL OF LILIES TOXIC TO DOGS?

Although lilies may cause nausea in dogs, the scent alone is not typically harmful. Toxic effects are usually only seen when something is swallowed or comes into contact with the skin.

The pollen from lilies, however, can be harmful. Pollen from the air may land on your dog and be licked off when they rub their face and snout together. While large dogs probably wouldn’t have much trouble after ingesting a little pollen, smaller or more sensitive canines could get sick. While breathing in pollen may cause some discomfort, it should pose no serious health risks.

However, cats are especially susceptible to lilies and lily pollen, so keep that in mind if you have any other pets at home.

CAN LILIES KILL DOGS?

If you’re a cat owner, you probably already know that lily poisoning may be quite dangerous, if not fatal, for felines. Even a small bit of the lily plant can be fatal for cats, causing them to become very sick and eventually develop renal failure. But, do flowers also have the ability to kill dogs?

To your dog’s relief, incidences of lethal lily poisoning are extremely uncommon. However, many lilies are still thought to be poisonous for dogs, and even if they consume a non-toxic type, they may become quite ill. Like with many things, the toxicity threshold for smaller dogs is lower.

WHAT HAPPENS IF A DOG EATS LILIES?

The effects of lily ingestion on your dog will vary with factors such as the dog’s weight, the amount consumed, and the specific kind of lily. Your dog may become listless and sleepy after eating lily parts; they may also vomit and lose their appetite.

Always keep an eye out for signs of disease or unusual behaviour in your dog. Please consult your veterinarian at the first sign of illness or suffering.

If your dog has become ill after eating a toxic plant, such as a lily or another plant, it is helpful to show the vet a picture of the plant or a little piece of the plant. Your veterinarian will be better able to analyse any potential toxicity risks or send you to a professional if you can identify it and provide them the common and scientific names.

SYMPTOMS OF LILY POISONING IN DOGS

Lily poisoning in dogs presents with signs that are similar to those of other toxicities. Acute lily poisoning symptoms include:

Vomiting
Diarrhoea
Lethargy
Loss of Appetite
Aching and/or swollen midsection
Dehydration
Alterations in the Urine’s Color
Seizures
Rhythm disturbance
Drooling to excess
symptoms of systemic inflammation including reddening of the skin, eyes, gums, lips, and tongue
In some cases, symptoms may not appear for several hours after intake, while in others, they may appear as soon as two hours later. For at least a day, keep an eye out for any signs of distress in your dog.

It all comes according to how much and what kind of lily your dog ate, so they may not exhibit all of these symptoms. To the contrary, you should visit the vet if your dog exhibits any of the classic signs of poisoning, including excessive drooling, vomiting, or a lack of appetite.

TREATMENT FOR LILY POISONING

In order to eliminate any remaining lily pieces from your dog’s stomach, your veterinarian may choose to induce vomiting. They may also give you activated charcoal, which binds to pollutants and stops your body from absorbing them. You can also try gastric lavage (stomach pumping) to remove the foreign material from your dog’s stomach. All of these strategies are an effort to limit the amount of harmful substances that enter their system.

Any additional care for lily toxicity is helpful. Intravenous fluids may be necessary to keep your dog hydrated, wash the toxins out of their system, and lessen the likelihood that their liver and kidneys may be damaged. Medications to prevent vomiting may also be given to your dog.

WHAT PLANTS ARE HARMFUL TO DOGS?

Along with lilies, other common plants that might be toxic to canines include:

Azaleas \sDaffodils
Hyacinths
Tulips
Roasted chestnuts from horses
Boletes sauvages
Holly \sIvy
Mistletoe
Acorns
The Cherry Trees (the fruit is safe.)
Yew
Natural remedy: aloe vera
The plants listed here are just the tip of the iceberg of the ones that could be harmful to your dog. For your convenience, we have compiled two separate lists: one of plants that are toxic to dogs, and another of plants that are safe for canine companions. Get in touch with your vet if you notice any symptoms after your dog has consumed any plant.

 

 

 

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